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Drinking and Eating While Driving

By: Garry Crystal - Updated: 24 Sep 2016 | comments*Discuss
 
Drinking And Eating Driving Conviction

Drinking and eating while driving doubles the likelihood of having a car crash. Drivers caught drinking and eating at the wheel could be convicted of driving without due care and attention (CD10).

The Dangers of Drinking and Eating While Driving

Drinking and eating at the wheel can cause a mental overload that diminishes the ability to deal with other events on the road. A study by Brunel University found that the number of crashes actually doubled with drivers who were eating and drinking while driving. Many drivers may view drinking and eating while driving as a fairly inconsequential act but it can easily lead to serious road traffic accidents. Driving without due care and attention (CD10) may be the minimum offence applied if a serious road traffic accident occurs. Around 53% of 3000 drivers surveyed admitted to consuming food and drink while driving.

Undue Care behind the Driving Wheel

The study carried out by Brunel University does show the dangers of driving while drinking and eating. But many drivers carry out a diversity of acts while driving that could lead to road accidents. Of the 3000 drivers polled, 12% admitted to smoking behind the wheel, 11% prepared for meetings and 6% applied make-up or got dressed while driving. Around 7% of drivers carried out the illegal act of using a mobile telephone while driving. In total, 54% of the 3000 surveyed claimed they had driven irresponsibly due to these acts.

Distracted Drivers Become a Police Target

The police are aware that distracted drivers can cause major road accidents. Speed cameras are frequently used to capture images of motorists drinking and eating while driving. One recent report involved an 18 year old student who completely lost control of her vehicle while eating and texting on a mobile phone while driving. It is very easy for road traffic police to spot distracted drivers, and speed cameras will help with evidence gathering. According to the police, drinking and driving at the wheel is as serious a distraction as driving under the influence of alcohol.

Penalties of Driving Without Due Care and Attention

A CD10 conviction, Driving Without Due Care and Attention, is a punishable offence. If convicted of this offence it can lead to three to nine penalty points being applied. There could also be fines applied for this offence depending on the severity of the offence. For instance, drinking and driving at the wheel may cause drivers to exceed the speed limit or cause a serious car crash endangering others. This type of offence will also undoubtedly lead to higher insurance premiums for the driver involved.

Higher Insurance Premiums When Convicted of a Motoring Offence

Increased insurance premiums will usually be applied to motorists who have been convicted of a motoring offence such as a CD10. Insurance companies have been known to refuse to give quotes for drivers who have been convicted or had penalty points applied. There has been controversy over the tactic of raising premiums even for minor traffic offences. The Association of British Drivers claim that insurers are simply looking for any excuse to make more money. But insurance companies will usually apply higher premiums to driver that they consider to have an increased risk factor.

Consequences of Drinking and Eating While Driving

Serious consequences for the perceived minor act of drinking and eating while driving can include-

  • Three to nine Penalty Points applied to a licence and a fine
  • Higher insurance premiums; as much as 40% higher than normal
  • Applied points could total enough for a driving disqualification
  • Lack of concentration can lead to very serious road accidents and increased penalty points and fines
  • Conviction of offences can often lead to the driver losing their job
  • Distracted drivers have been know to cause serious accidents including the deaths of other road users
Drinking and eating while driving may seem like a minor offence but this act can have serious consequences for drivers and road users. Not only can this act lead to convictions and higher insurance premiums but distractions can lead to the lives of other drivers being changed forever. Drivers should take the precaution of drinking and eating only at rest stops or in parking areas.

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[Add a Comment]
I have accross the traffic after few seconds it came to red as there was an ambulance behind intend to pass with his blue lights. I have got a flashed last night I don't know whether Iwill get a fine plus 3 point on my licence as I have never had speed camera offences or flashed on traffic light for 10 years si ce I've got my licence. Any advice pl
Ravi - 21-Jul-16 @ 6:53 AM
marbiz - Your Question:
My grandson passed his test a year ago. Whilst driving his fathers small car, he skidded on "black ice" (supported by weather temperature reports. Skidded and hit a 30mph sign. This was paid for by my grandson to the local Council. After the crash (no damage other than the post) a homeowner came out shouting and swearing so he left the scene. Later that night arrived and he was charged with leaving the scene and not reporting it. He had an appointment and the local police office was not manned that night. Hence he could not report it before the police had actually arrived. What most likely will be his penalty as he pleaded not guilty. He was also charged for driving without due care but the weather here was against him that night.

Our Response:
We can't really comment on the driving without due care offence, as we don't have the full details and this will be for the police/courts to decide. A driver of a vehicle involved in an accident on a road or public place and that causes damage to another vehicle or to someone else's property (including street lamps etc) must either stop and give details to the other party or owner of the property. If there's noone there to give your details to, you must report the matter to the police - it's against the law not to.
NoPenaltyPoints - 7-Jun-16 @ 2:42 PM
My grandson passed his test a year ago. Whilst driving his fathers small car, he skidded on "black ice" (supported by weather temperature reports. Skidded and hit a 30mph sign. This was paid for by my grandson to the local Council. After the crash (no damage other than the post) a homeowner came out shouting and swearing so he left the scene. Later that night arrived and he was charged with leaving the scene and not reporting it. He had an appointment and the local police office was not manned that night. Hence he could not report it before the police had actually arrived. What most likely will be his penalty as he pleaded not guilty. He was also charged for driving without due care but the weather here was against him that night.
marbiz - 6-Jun-16 @ 12:01 PM
Simple want to keep your licence then don't be a pratt, can you live with the knowledge that you have killed someone cause your tired hungry thirsty pissed or showing off to mate think hard people think hard
Kram - 23-Jan-16 @ 8:12 AM
I went though a red light today, I thought I had just made the yellow period but I am 90% sure I saw a flash as I went through. What penalty points and fines are issued for running a red light?
EJ - 11-Jan-16 @ 3:45 PM
What is the difference?? Talking on a mobile?? Smoking at the wheel?? Lighting a cigarette while driving ??? None its all dangerous??
Tez - 10-Feb-15 @ 8:11 PM
My husband crashed his car into someone, wrote it off and fled the scene of the accident. He was caught twenty minutes later and arrested for drink driving. His reading was over 100. He is now on bail and has to attend court very soon. What is the likely penalty ?
Ben - 7-Aug-14 @ 11:47 PM
Given the number of reported fatal accidents involving mobile phone use whilst driving. I feel it is time to change the law. To give the police powers to crush mobile phones at the road side as well as a mandatory 12 month driving ban as well as a £1000 fine. Removing a mobile phone from someone at the road side and crushing it I feel would deter most people. It is also time to start handing out much longer prison sentences, if a driver fails to stop for a marked police car and has to be pursued by the police I feel a mandatory minimum five year prison sentence would not be unreasonable. At least this would take offenders out of circulation.
sircbm - 3-Aug-14 @ 9:42 PM
My son Frazer was killed by a banned driver on the 24th May 2012. I have had my licence over 34 years and always follows rules of the road. I cannot comment on the facts relating to this crash. If you drive a vehicle on public roads and kill, at the time you are a banned driver... You chose to get in that vehicle no one made you, and as you arean adult with a banned driver licence, then you must face up to a life time ban and serve a manslaughter charge! The victims families have got a life sentence all because this person who thinks by crying it's ok!! We need to send a clear message to these people that you get in a car and kill then you will be held under a manslaughter charge and serve no less than 14 years. This works in other countries,..it shoud apply here too. Justice to all road crash victims who are killed by banned drivers.
Jim - 25-Aug-13 @ 10:39 AM
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